21 Ethical Underwear That You Should Consider Now

Sustainable underwear is a great introduction to ethical clothing.

Looking to walk away from fast fashion for good and don’t know where to start?

Yes, we have zeroed in on sustainable shirts, denims, and even sustainable winter wear, but what about our undergarments?

Here’s the deal: if you look at your underwear tag and it says it’s made of a synthetic blend, chances are it didn’t come from sustainable sources.

Most ethical underwear companies create products made of a single fabric, and these are made from renewable sources like hemp, bamboo, or organic cotton. But you’ll be surprised to know about other eco-friendly alternatives like recycled nylon and recycled silk, for example.

Want to know more about what makes an underwear brand sustainable?

That’s where this list comes in.

I’ve reviewed 21 sustainable underwear brands to help you choose the right fit–in more ways than one! What I mean is, I’ve summarized each company’s mission and what makes them sustainable. This includes their packaging, materials, and of course, affordability.

Note that the prices given below are subject to change especially if the original product was converted to U.S. dollars.

Let’s look at each company in more detail.

1.   Hara The Label

In Hindi, hara means green. And this brand certainly lives up to its name. Hara’s mission is to educate the world about what needs improvement in the fashion world like chemical dumping and excessive plastic use. Founder Allie Cameron spent time in India and Indonesia communicating with farmers about sustainability and trying to find answers to fashion’s greatest problems.

Allie Cameron’s dedication to sustainability formed at a young age when she discovered the joy of second-hand clothing. This concern for the negative effects of fast fashion became Hara’s guiding principle.

As for ethical practices, all their workers are part of the Australian Textile, Clothing, Footwear and Associated Industries Award 2010. This ensures fair wage and safe working conditions. Furthermore, Hara does not support child or forced labor.

Transparency is important within Hara. Since Hara sources and produces all their products in Australia, they can trace each product from all points of the process. Moreover, this lets them effectively cut down on fossil fuel use. At their work centers, they have implemented recycling systems.

  • Materials: All of Hara’s undergarments are made of bamboo fabric. This fabric comes from bamboo fiber which is derived from bamboo pulp. To get this fiber, the pulp is soaked in non-toxic chemicals which are also commonly used in organic cotton-, soap-, and food production. Their bamboo is sourced from suppliers with organic and OEKO-TEX 100 certifications. The latter certifies that they don’t use any harmful chemicals in their production process. Thus, the bamboo fabric is soft, hypo-allergenic, and odor-resistant. Additionally, Hara uses natural plant dye that they produced. These dyes include turmeric, indigo, and madder root.
  • Packaging: Hara states that their products are naturally packaged, but I could not find other specific information on their website.
  • Price: Prices range from about $28 to $33 for both bottoms and bras.

2.   PansyCo

Sourced, designed, and produced locally in California, PansyCo rightly belongs on our sustainable underwear brands list. Laura Schoorl and Rachel Corry founded Pansy in 2013 after recognizing that there were no ethical underwear brands that were also comfortable and beautiful.

Currently, their studio is located in Oakland, California. However, they ship to international stores in various countries including Japan, Australia, Bermuda, Canada, and the United Kingdom. So if you’d rather try one out in person, chances are there’s a physical store you can visit near you.

They offer a wide selection of undergarments: high rise bottoms, low rise bottoms, full bras, sports bras, and cross strap bras. Additionally, they offer shirts, shorts, pants, robes, leggings, and socks. All of their styles are minimal and natural, reflecting Pansy’s call for simple, yet beautifully-designed ethical underwear.

Bonus: they also sell coloring books featuring Pansy-inspired art from the community.

  • Materials: All of their garments are made of organic cotton from Texas, processed in North Carolina, and dyed in Novato, California. Their rubber and cotton elastics are sourced from South Carolina. Their undergarments are dyed with fiber-reactive dyes to ensure long-lasting, no-bleed colors. Choose from natural, almond, mauve, black, sunflower, rust, avocado, red, and azul.
  • Packaging: Their invoices are printed on recycled stock paper. And their products? They’re shipped in an organic cotton jersey bag fashioned from production scraps. The best part? You can reuse the bag for carrying small items like coins or buttons.
  • Price: Their products range from $39 to $62.

3.   Organic Basics

Organic Basics is a sustainable underwear brand based in Copenhagen, Denmark. However, they work with trusted factories that do not support child or forced labor. These factories go beyond and provide childcare and free meals for their workers in addition to a fair wage and safe working conditions.

This company is also defined by ground-breaking sustainable fabrics. Now get this: most companies use organic cotton and hemp, but Organic Basics? They use recycled nylon, recycled wool, TENCEL, and SilverTech fabrics. These fabrics are carefully chosen and made to last. This means less water used, less energy expended, and less carbon emitted.

In a nutshell, Organic Basics is an exemplary ethical underwear brand. They’re a certified B corporation, meaning they meet rigorous environmental and social impact standards. In 2019, they offset more than 1800 tons of carbon through their partnership with CHOOSE and a wind farm in Turkey.

Lastly, their office in Copenhagen is moving towards zero waste. They’ve begun serving vegetarian and vegan meals, cutting out plastic, and offsetting their carbon footprint.

  • Materials: Organic Basics uses recycled nylon, wool, and cashmere, and their trademarked TENCEL Lyocell, SilverTech, and Polygiene. It seems that Organic Basis is always working towards the highest standard of sustainability. If you want to see it for yourself, read their impact report here. If you’re wondering what TENCEL is, it’s a soft fabric sourced from tree pulp. It’s breathable, hypoallergenic, and most importantly, low-impact. On the other hand, SilverTech is made of recycled nylon. This makes for an antimicrobial, odor-resistance, and extremely durable underwear.
  • Packaging: Organic Basics’ new packaging is made of reusable, recycled paper. Furthermore, their cardboard shipping box is made with FSC-certified paper.
  • Price:  For women, their bottoms are available from about $40 USD to $50 USD for 2-packs. Their bras are $70 USD on average.

For men, their briefs run from about $45 USD to $65 USD. Their shirts range from $39 USD to $98 USD, which includes long-sleeve sporty undershirts.

4.   Pact

PACT is headquartered in Boulder, Colorado that champions organic cotton. Why organic cotton? It uses about 95% less water than traditional cotton. Growing and processing organic cotton doesn’t require harmful chemicals, dyes, or pesticides.

I’ll spare you all the (impressive!) statistics, but consider this: about two pounds (one kilogram) of clothing made from organic cotton saves enough drinking water to last two and a half years compared to conventional cotton! I know this might seem insignificant, but it’s actually extremely important for countries that have little water sources and farm non-organic cotton.

Basically, organic cotton kills two birds with one eco-friendly stone.

When a product requires more elasticity, Pact uses elastane. This stretchy fiber also helps make underwear more lasting. What’s more, Pact is certified by the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS). This organization studies companies’ textile practices such as social and environmental impact.

PACT is also fair trade certified, which ensures that their workers thrive in safe conditions. Additionally, Pact ensures that workers can contribute back to their community through social development projects. Re: Pact does not condone child labor or sweatshops.

Besides the production process, they also offer a clothes donation program to encourage reduce and reuse habits. They collect pre-loved clothes from customers and donate to nonprofits. To make it even easier for customers, they provide prepaid shipping labels.

  • Materials:  Pact uses organic cotton and elastane. Elastane is a synthetic fiber that helps extend underwear life. Equally important, they do not use dyes or pesticides in their organic cotton.
  • Packaging: Pact switched from single-use plastic packaging to biodegradable plastic. This is a tremendous discovery. A plastic-eating enzyme that eliminates wasteful packaging? Count us in!
  • Price: For women, the bottoms are $12 each. Their tops range from $20 USD to $30 USD.

For men, the briefs are $12 USD each.

For kids, they have bottoms for $6 each. For babies, the bodysuits are all $10 and below.

5.   TheVeryGoodBra

There are many sustainable underwear brands who may claim they are zero waste, but The Very Good Bra lives up to their promises. Founder Stephanie Devine wanted to create a zero waste bra that was available in a wide range of sizes. The company is based in Australia.

The Very Good Bra offers a completely biodegradable and compostable bra. They do not use polyesters, nylon, or other synthetic elastics in their product.

Get this: they left a bra in a worm farm and the little critters ate it up within 8 weeks. Why is this so important? Well, nylon, a common bra fabric, takes 30 to 40 years to break down. Compared to 8 weeks, that’s a lifetime!

Aside from materials, they work with responsible suppliers around the globe, including India, France, and Switzerland. Their manufacturing takes place in Hong Kong and China, where the owners fully recognize the important of zero waste products in today’s world.

To further reduce waste, The Very Good Bra operates in a unique way: three times a year, customers can pre-order to guarantee a size and color. This way, they don’t make excess clothing and tackle fast fashion straight from the source.

  • Materials:  The Very Good Bra is made of Tencel, which is a natural-based fabric made from tree rubber. Their elastics are made with organic cotton, as well as their labels and threads. They also use vegetable-based inks.
  • Packaging: Products are sent covered in recyclable tissue and a compostable box. This box comes from Sendle, a carbon-neutral shipper based in Australia–the first of its kind.
  • Price: Their namesake The Very Good Bra is about $55 and their briefs are around $25 each. They also offer cotton shorts and camisoles for a little more than $30 each.

6.   PROCLAIM

Proclaim is an inclusive undergarment brand specializing in nude lingerie. They’re inclusive of all sizes, but also of all skin colors. The color “nude” often overlooks a whole rainbow of skin tones, and Proclaim successfully addresses this issue.

They first started out in San Francisco, but now they are based in Los Angeles, California. All their design, assembly, and production also take place here. Furthermore, their employees are paid hourly wages compared to unfair factories that pay per apparel made.

But you know what may be the coolest thing about this company? They use recycled PET bottles to make bras! See the details below.

  • Materials: Their lingerie line is made of TENCEL, which is a wood-based fabric. Making TENCEL is extremely resource conservative because the water and solvents used are recyclable. They also use recycled polyester made of plastic water bottles. And don’t worry–they only use BPA-free bottles certified safe by the Scientific Certification Systems (SCS). Basically, the bottles are broken down, reheated, then spun into yarn. If this sounds too good to be true, check out their collection for yourself; I promise you won’t be disappointed. However, it’s helpful to note that they also use Spandex in their products.
  • Packaging: They use poly mailers (a plastic), but they are reusable and recyclable. These mailers are also locally sourced in the USA and are made of recycled materials. Still not impressed? Get this: their label fasteners are made from natural hemp to replace plastic.
  • Price: Their women’s briefs are $28 each, available in three different nude shades and black. Their TENCEL bras are $59 each, available in three nude shades and black. Their recycled polyester bras are about $60 each, available in three nude shades.

7.   Boody

Boody is an Australia-based brand that solely uses bamboo in their wide range of products. When creating Boody, the founders kept sustainability and comfort in mind.

They are certified by a remarkable list of eco-friendly organizations. For starters, they’re certified by Ecocert, which analyzes companies’ agricultural and facility processes. What’s next? They’re certified by OEKO-TEX, which ensures that each Boody product is safe for customers’ skins. This includes making sure they use no harmful dyes or metals in their products.

Since they use bamboo, Boody is also certified with the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) which indicates that they source bamboo from responsible suppliers that do not destroy habitats.

I was also very impressed by their International Organization for Standardization (ISO) certification. Here’s a little background: ISO sets global industry standards for various sectors–anything from camping gear to bamboo underwear.

Now, Boody meets the ISO 14001 standard, which means Boody is dedicated to keeping negative environmental impacts low or nonexistent. The certification holds Boody accountable to improve the company’s positive environmental impacts, achieve environmental goals, and comply with environmental codes.

  • Materials: Boody uses organic, pesticide-free bamboo. Bamboo conserves water–it only needs rainwater to thrive. Bamboo also regenerates quickly, unlike other trees that take decades to grow. As for feel and functionality, it tops the charts. Bamboo is hypoallergenic, anti-fungal, and breathable. This keeps sweat and heat at bay. More importantly, their products offer protection from the sun.
  • Packaging: Their products are packaged in recycled paper and printed with vegetable inks.
  • Price: For the women’s line, their bottoms are about $13 to $15 each. Their bras range from a little over $15 to $40.

For the men’s collection, the bottoms are about $15 to $27 each.

Their baby onesies are about $35 each, available in three colors and two striped colors.

8.   Everlane

Everlane is known for their sustainable, chic outerwear, but guess what? They also have a line of eco-friendly underwear.

Their motto is designing clothes that last. They do so by partnering with trustworthy factories and sourcing sustainable, durable materials.

For instance, their Pima cotton from Peru is one of the best quality cottons in the world. The crop is picked by hand to ensure it isn’t damaged. This is helpful in two ways: the end product is more durable and softer.

One glaring fact you’ll realize on their website is that they care about their workers, so they carefully choose factories that treat their workers right. Furthermore, Everlane donates their yearly Black Friday sales profits to improve workers’ lives.

Everlane has also partnered with Oceana, a nonprofit that’s helping ban single-use plastic around the world. They do so by talking directly with politicians and voters. Everlane’s part is helping fund Oceana’s campaign to help them continue urgent work.

With all these social impact initiatives, it’s no wonder that Everlane is proudly advocating for what they call radical transparency, or being honest with consumers about where their products come from and how they’re made.

  • Materials: Everlane products are all high quality products. There’s no doubt about it. However, I could not find a single specific sheet containing a materials list. They do however, have a page where you can browse each factory they work with and what they produce. Note that their products still contain some synthetic materials. Additionally, they have a line of outerwear made of recycled water bottles.
  • Packaging: Everlane’s products are packaged in recyclable paper boxes.
  • Price: The women’s bottoms are priced $12 each while the bras are all about $25 each.

9.   Reformation

Reformation is going back to basics: simple shapes that highlight the feminine body. How are they making it sustainable? They’re choosing fabrics that have a combined positive social and environmental impact.

At Reformation, they’ve created their own grading system for fabrics which reviews eight important factors: water use, energy use, environmental pollution (if any), greenhouse gas emissions, human safety, availability, and affordability.

So here is the big idea: Reformation aims to use all or mostly natural fibers from plants regenerate quickly or from recycled fibers.

They’ve also launched zero waste programs in their factories through fabric recycling and refurbishing. How? By partnering with a local recycling center and coordinating with their suppliers.

In short, Reformation wants to reduce fast fashion waste before the products are even made. This mindset is more important than ever, especially when you consider that only 1% of polyester clothing (a common material) is recycled.

  • Materials: Reformation uses TENCEL which is fiber made from wood material. They also combine this fabric with recycled cotton waste to make REFIBRA. Moreover, Reformation uses viscose (rayon), linen, recycled cotton, organic cotton, Recover (recycled fabric), recycled nylon, recycled cashmere, alpaca wool, and deadstock fabrics. This last one caught my eye. So deadstock fabric is basically unused fabric from other brands or warehouses. Instead of throwing these into landfills, companies like Reformation are swooping in to transform them into sustainable clothing. Almost 5% of Reformation’s product list is made of vintage clothing. This saves almost 15,000 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions a year per person!
  • Packaging: Reformation’s bags are biodegradable and are made of recycled materials.
  • Price: The bottoms are about $15 to $35. Their bras range from about $32 to $85.

10. Warp + Weft

Warp and Weft is a family-owned business that started out with denim. They’ve achieved remarkable feats through their efficient production systems and machinery. For instance, they boast using less than 10 gallons of water per pair of jeans compared to 1,500 for a traditional pair.

And another important thing is they reuse this water after treating it. Instead of using bleach to wash their jeans, they use Dry Ozone technology to avoid water contamination.

Beyond that, they sponsored a clean water project in Malawi to provide safe water for more than 3,000 people. If you want to make a contribution, you can: they match donations you provide to charity:water.

What’s more, their products are truly affordable, which is sometimes untrue for many brands who claim to be sustainable. Because they can trace their products from raw materials to sale, they avoid middlemen markups.

What does this mean for consumers? This means high quality products at an affordable price, making eco-friendly clothing available to all.

Another defining feature for Warp and Weft is their inclusive clothing line. Founder Sarah Ahmed believes in inclusivity and as one of the few women in the denim industry, she knows just how important representation is.

  • Materials: Their women’s undergarments are made of tencel, spandex, and cotton. Warp and Weft also uses cotton, Lycra, and Tencel from the United States. Their dyes are sourced from Europe.
  • Packaging: Unfortunately, I could not find information on Warp and Weft’s packaging, but I will update this list if anything changes on their end.
  • Price: Their women’s bottoms are $12 each, available in four shades of nude, and in black and white. The men’s briefs are $25 each, available in two-tone white and red and black and white.

11.   People Tree

People Tree started back in 1991 when sustainable underwear brands weren’t even on the public agenda. Safia Minney founded People Tree based on respectable ethics, high environmental standards, and versatile designs and prints on top quality materials.

Their products are crafted using traditional expertise like hand weaving, hand knitting, embroidery, and block printing. It’s no surprise that they were the first fashion brand to receive the World Fair Trade Organisation (WFTO) product label.

From the beginning until now, People Tree has always been devoted to providing fair wages, ensuring safe working conditions, and promoting positive environmental impacts.

What’s more, People Tree is helping connect traditional producers with modern technology. What’s the big idea? This helps their partners achieve control over their own products and processes while helping their business grow.

While technology helps scale production, traditional techniques like hand embroidery provides economic opportunity for countless families in various countries. Handwork also eliminates carbon dioxide emission from unnecessary machines.

Additionally, People Tree is certified by the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS), Soil Association, Fairtrade International, WFTO, and the PETA-approved vegan certification. Together, the standards from these certifications hold People Tree accountable for their goals and effects whether positive or negative.

  • Materials: People Tree uses TENCEL Lyocell, responsibly-sourced wool, and organic cotton. Their clothes are dyed with low-impact, chemical-free dyes.
  • Packaging: Their reusable box is not only eco-friendly, it helps people in need. Customers can reuse their product box to donate gently used clothes or household items through the charity Give Back Box. Customers can send in anything from DVDS to jewelry to shirts.
  • Price: The women’s bottoms are $15 each. Their bras range from about $30 to $35. They also offer camisoles at $38 each.

12.   Knickey

Knickey pledges to use only organic cotton and a more eco-friendly production process. The result? Zero pesticides, less water use, no greenhouse gases released, and no chemical pollution.

What’s lesser known about the benefits of organic cotton is it reduces use of crude oil and fossil fuels. This directly affects how much carbon dioxide emissions go up into our atmosphere. Just think: about 340 million barrels of oil is used annually to make synthetic clothing. This is especially true for polyester and polyester-like fabrics.

Knickey also supports recycling by something surprising: upcycling older underwear into various purposes. Some great products are rug pads, rugs, and even insulation material. They’ve partnered with a New York non-profit to prevent recyclable clothing from ending up in landfills. As if doing a good deed isn’t enough, Knickey is also throwing in a free pair of underwear for each box you send in!

Note that their recycling program is only available in the United States.

  • Materials: Knickey uses strictly organic cotton only with non-GMO seeds, zero pesticides, and organic fertilizers. This makes for a soft, breathable fabric free from toxins.
  • Packaging: Their plastic-free packaging is made of (almost all) recycled materials. Knickey’s box materials are Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified, sourced from sustainably harvested trees. Their inks are safe and their adhesives are reusable.
  • Price: Their bottoms are $13 each, available in seven different colors and three styles.

13.  Cuup

Cuup is fully committed to making comfortable bras that fits all shapes and sizes. Two of the founders were baffled when they found out they had been wearing the wrong bra size their whole life. So Lauran Cohan and Abby Morgan wanted to make sure women had access to comfy bras available in various sizes.

Instead of following the bra industry’s template when it came to bras, Cuup called up women of all silhouettes and created a line of undergarments that would fit the wearer and not the other way around.

They offer cup sizes from A to H. They also provide a wide range of model photographs online to help consumers shop for the perfect fit.

  • Materials: Cuup’s classic sheer mesh bras are with nylon and spandex. Their microfiber bras are made with polyamide and elastane. Certain bras also contain thin underwires for more support. For optimal comfort, the cups are sewn, not made by molds. Their undies are made with cellulose fiber called Modal and elastane.
  • Packaging: Sadly, I could not find explicit information on CUUP’s packaging, but rest assured, I will update this list as needed.
  • Price: Their bottoms are $18 each, available in four styles and nude, black, and green. Their bras are $68 each, available in five different styles and various colors including nude, green, and black.

14.  Brook There

Brook There is a US-based brand that makes comfortable underwear that promotes personal confidence. Besides personal confidence, Brook There also inspires industry confidence through their low-impact distribution and production process.

Their fabrics come from South Carolina or California and brought to Pennsylvania for dying, and then to Massachusetts for assembly. Then it is shipped to customers. This short distance between production and distribution cuts down on transportation costs–both financially and environmentally.

And because their products don’t have to travel great distances, they don’t use plastic bags to protect items during transport or storage.

Aside from the products, Brook There chooses organic cotton to protect workers and the environment from harmful insecticides. Unfortunately, traditional cotton farming uses chemicals that puts workers at risk for cancers, skin diseases, and respiratory problems.

Insecticides also live on in water sources, in the ground, and in the air, polluting every part of our physical environment.

  • Materials: Brook There uses organic GOTS-certified cotton and genuine silk. Their elastic trims, laces, and silk are sourced from USA buyers who import internationally. They currently do not have bras with underwires, nor are they planning to make any. Note that their silk products are not vegan.
  • Fact: mainstream bra cups and pads are made with harmful chemicals that often stay on the finished product. This is why Brook There’s bras are padding and foam-free. Frankly, they have not found a sustainable source that lives up to the company’s standards.
  • Packaging: Brook There uses recycled poly bags and recycled tissue paper from a company called EcoEnclose. Moreover, larger orders come in a recyclable cardboard box.
  • Price: Brook There’s organic cotton undies are $22 to $64. Their cotton bras range from $48 to $88.

On the other hand, their silk bottoms are $36 to $64. Their silk bras are $56 to $88.

15.  Naja

Naja is a sustainable underwear brand empowering women on both sides of the market. Their workforce is mostly made up of single mothers and head of households. Being a single mother is tough enough, and when employers don’t understand the unpredictable nature of parenthood, their lives are made harder.

Good news: at Naja, employees have a fair balance between work and childcare. Additionally, employees’ children are gifted school supplies like uniforms, books, and meals.

Other social impact programs include their Underwear for Hope program, which provides economic opportunity for Colombian women. A percentage of Naja’s profits also go to local charities that provide educational opportunities for these same workers.

In terms of positive environmental practices, Naja uses digital technologies to print their garments. This saves water waste on a huge scale.

Furthermore, Naja is gradually incorporating recycled plastic fabric into their clothing lines. Aside from materials, their craftsmanship is what makes Naja stand out. Handmade products make for high quality underwear you’re proud to own.

  • Materials: Their bras are made of various materials: organic cotton, elastane, nylon, Spandex, memory foam, recycled plastic, polyester. Their bottoms are made of similar material minus the memory foam cups. Their prints are made with digital machines to avoid water waste. Note that they have an eco-friendly section for both bottoms and bras.
  • Packaging: Unfortunately, I did not find any information about Naja’s packaging practices.
  • Price: Their bottoms are available from $20 to $30. Their bras are $36 to $65.

16.  Botanica Workshop

If you’re looking for an artist-lounging-lazily-on-a-day-bed-in-underwear aesthetic, Botanica Workshop is your answer. Their name refers to their eco-friendly approach and their craftsmanship, respectively.

They began in 2014 when the founders wanted to create designer-feel and luxury quality underwear.

They then partnered with local artists and craftspeople to create a variety of high quality garments. This group of creatives meets several times in Los Angeles, California. At the heart of Botanica Workshop is the importance of local sourcing and manufacturing. The company invests in local talent and businesses to foster a thriving community.

Sustainability is also a distinct lifestyle within the brand: most employees walk or take public transportation. At their studio, they practice composting, recycling, and utilizing second hand tools.

  • Materials: Botanica Workshop uses organic cotton, silk, and recycled nylon. Their organic cotton is GOTS certified and knit in the USA, though there are some instances where the cotton is not locally-sourced. Botanica Workshop’s recycled nylon is OEKO-TEX certified, making it skin-safe by strict European standards. Their clothing trims are made from both natural and synthetic materials. Lastly, their dyes are made from low-impact synthetic dyes. Note that their silk underwear is combined with Spandex for elasticity and a stronger product.
  • Packaging: For Botanica Workshop’s packaging, I could not find explicit information about their recyclability or biodegradability. As always, I will update this page if and when new information comes to light.
  • Price: Botanica Workshop’s organic cotton bottoms are $65 to $82 each. On the other hand, their stretch silk briefs are $92 to $120 each.

Their organic cotton bralettes are $78 apiece, available in fifteen different colors/patterns. Their silk bralettes are $138 to $202 each.

17.    The Nude Label

The Nude Label is based in Valencia, Spain where the city is nestled between the Mediterranean Sea and the wondrous mountains. This calm aesthetic and natural feel comes through in their products.

Furthermore, their family-run factory is located in the same city, so the founders have greater control over the production process. More importantly, they’re able to ensure firsthand that working conditions are up to code.

Instead of machine-produced products, The Nude Label utilizes skilled workers in every step of the undergarment’s construction. Each piece is assembled by a different person, which speaks to the product’s high quality.

  • Materials: The Nude Label’s undergarments are made with organic cotton and elastane sourced from Portugal. The supplier is GOTS-certified and meets the OEKO-TEX 100 Standard. Moreover, they’re part of the Better Cotton Initiative, which is an international nonprofit that champions cotton farmers and the environment. The Nude Label also uses recycled polyamide or recycled nylon. This fabric resists pilling, which makes it long lasting. And where does the material come from? The Nude Labels saves fishing nets, clothing scraps, leftover carpeting, and landfill plastic, among other sources. Recycled nylon also provides UV protection and dries easily. 
  • Packaging: I was unable to find information on the Nude Label’s packaging, but we will keep an eye out for updates!
  • Price: The bottoms are about $15 to about $25. Their bras are a little more than $35 to about $50. Each product is available in at least nine warm, gentle colors like pumpkin, rust, and soft lilac.

18.    Azura Bay

Azura Bay’s motto is cute, comfy, and conscious. But the company’s mission to empower women doesn’t stop at making comfortable, eco-conscious clothes. What’s different about Azura Bay is it’s a one-stop-shop for ethical lingerie brands.

Founder Ashley McIntosh wanted customers to easily find environmentally-friendly undergarments that were also stylish and high quality. She took the work out of sifting through countless brands and created Azura Bay.

These brands embody sustainability through ethical practices, Fair Trade materials, and environmentally-friendly processes. Brands include New-York based Only Hearts, Miami-headquartered Cosabella, Quebec-based Sokoloff, England-sourced Iris London, and Copenhagen-based Underprotection.

  • Materials: The materials vary by company, but these include: hemp, organic cotton, Spandex, cotton, polyamide, elastane, supima cotton, TENCEL lyocell, and recycled lace. Their dyes include vegan, vegetable dyes.
  • Packaging: Azura Boxes ships products in recycled boxes and recycled tissue paper made in the USA. They also use compostable mailers using Better Packaging Co, which is headquartered in New Zealand but have centers in the US.
  • Price: Their undies are about $25 to $60.

Their bras range from $30 to about $110 for a nursing bralette.

19.   Wama

Wama proudly uses hemp for their products. Partnering with organic farms, Wama wants to make hemp a substantial contender in the sustainable underwear world.

They manufacture all their products in China-based textiles, where factories work with employees under safe working conditions and fair wages. Furthermore, they’re certified as a Green America Certified Business, which means they meet rigorous standards for social and environmental impacts.

All of their products are also PETA Approved Vegan, which means no animal products or byproducts are ever used in any of their collections.

So why hemp? For starters, to date, they have saved enough water to last more than 650,000 days. As a clothing material, hemp has various benefits. It is naturally anti-bacterial and thus resists odor. A great feature to have for undergarments, right?

Moreover, hemp is best washed with cold water and hung dry. So this saves energy from avoiding hot water and the dryer. It’s a win-win!

  • Materials: Wama uses hemp, which is soft, organic, and breathable. For dye, they use safe fabric-reactive dyes.
  • Packaging: Wama ships a majority of their orders with recycled poly mailers, which are designed to be reused or recycled. Their tissue paper is made from recycled materials and is biodegradable. Additionally, their promo materials like stickers come from recycled paper. For larger orders, Wama ships products using custom-made recycled boxes that are also biodegradable.
  • Price: For men, the briefs are $24. For women, the undies are $20 each, available in four styles: hipsters, bikinis, thongs, and boy shorts.

20.  Patagonia

Patagonia is one of the more well-known brands on our list, but they’re usually known for outdoor or active gear. Did you know they also have a collection of eco-friendly underwear?

They have  established environmental and social initiatives. For instance, more than 70% of their clothing line in 2020 is made from recycled materials like recycled cotton, recycled polyester, recycled nylon, hemp, and more. For new, raw materials, they use eco-friendly options like organic cotton and lyocell.

Since they’re such a big company, it’s no wonder they’re able to impact thousands of lives. Through their Fair Trade program, more than 65,000 workers have economic power.

Moreover, Patagonia is actually a founding member of the Fair Labor Association (FLA) which is based in Washington, D.C. This group does important work in the fashion industry: they hold companies accountable for their labor practices. An accreditation from FLA means workers receive fair wages and protected working conditions.

  • Materials: The bottoms are made of recycled nylon, spandex jersey, polyester, and spandex mesh. Their bras are made of a nylon and spandex blend, mesh, and polyester. Their undergarments are treated with HeiQ® Fresh for odor control.
  • Packaging: Patagonia uses a polybag for each product, but they are currently working on more eco-friendly solutions. They haven’t discovered an alternative to poly bags, but they are implementing practices like making the poly bag sizes smaller, cutting out paper mailers, and recycling collected poly bags.
  • Price: Patagonia’s bottoms are $18 to $24. Their bras are $45 to $65.

21.    SheThinx

SheThinx is more than a sustainable underwear brand. They’re making period talk less taboo, so girls and women don’t miss out on life just because they are experiencing something natural.

This brand makes underwear that absorbs your period. Yes, it’s that simple. They make custom-made undies that keep period products out of landfills while keeping you safe and comfortable.

Of course, this depends on how heavy your flow is, so you might need some adjustment period. Needless to say, you might want to undergo this adjustment period at home until you know what works for you.

Besides great products, SheThinx provides help for disadvantaged communities. They’ve implemented a GiveRise program, which advocates for better puberty education and supports activism. This activism helps fight discrimination in the school and work place and helps provide menstrual products to students.

So for each purchase you make with SheThinx, you’re actually supporting millions of young students across the USA.

  • Materials: They use organic cotton, elastane, polyester, nylon, Spandex, and polyamide. Furthermore, they use OEKO-TEX certified fabric treatments to control odor and moisture.
  • Packaging:  Their packaging is completely biodegradable.
  • Price: Their undies are about $25 to $45.

What is your favorite sustainable underwear brand?

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